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30 AMP TO 40 AMP

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  • 30 AMP TO 40 AMP

    I had an electrian wire my rental house for an electric range. He wired for 30 AMP when we were replacing drywall. I didn't realize until after that most all electric ranges are 40-50 AMP required. Is there an easy way of re-wiring at the plug. The wire was run outside in a roof with no crawl space (wires were exposed prior to putting new drywall). The electrician says it would require putting new wiring, which would require me to open up walls and ceiling. Anyone have any suggestions?

  • #2
    I have never heard of a 30 amp circuit for an electric range. It might do for a two burner counter unit but not a free standing floor unit. Any range I've installed for except a Jennair I've used #6 Aluminum SEU but now with the new code this expands to #6 Al - SER. 6 aluminum is good for 40 amps in a residence. You pretty much have no choice but to rewire for 40 amps. Does the unit have a cellar? First floor or second? If no basement where is the panelbox located?

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    • #3
      This is an older home with brick exterior walls. The new panel is at the back of the home. We wired in the roof through a bedroom, bathroom, and then kitchen and dropped down a center wall. This has a flat roof so no crawl space. It had exposed beams, but after wiring we insulated and coved them with drywall. I've searched for options, even tried looking for a smaller range (30 amp). I just don't want to cut through the drywall and insulation.

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      • #4
        OK given what you told me and what you don't want to do leaves one option. Go out your panelbox through the wall (outside) then run in metal conduit around your house to the kitchen. Hopefully the range is on an outside wall. Go back inside (through the outside wall) to a surface mounted receptacle 4 wire. Pigtail for the range should also be a 4 wire. If this is no good then you're back to square one. Call back the electrician that wired it up in the first place. He should have known better than run a 10 ga for a range. If there's any tearing up to do to get the proper sized wire to the location he'll have to eat it.

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        • #5
          First off, I assume you used NM cable to wire it so changing it is going to be a big problem. If you had conduit you could just pull new wire. Also, make sure the wire in your circuit is #10 copper or #8 aluminum and connected to the 30 amp breaker just so you know the wire is too small and are not assuming this by the size of the breaker.

          Article 210.19 (A) (3) of the 2008 National Electrical Code requires 40 amp minimum for a standard range circuit. Your "electrician" should pay to have it changed, he apparently doesn't know what he is doing and now you are stuck with an undersized circuit.

          Hayzee had a good suggestion and might be the easiest way to get from here to there.

          You will need #4 copper AWG or #6 aluminum AWG THHN/THWN for the hot wires and neutral of a 40 amp circuit. The equipment grounding conductor (if you are using PVC conduit) has to be a #10 AWG copper or #8 aluminum. 3/4 inch schedule 40 PVC or 3/4 inch EMT will hold 4 - #6's so you will have enough room for the wire.

          Happy Friday
          ArchonOSX

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          • #6
            pull in a new wire and be done with your problem. your electrician should have known what a electric range draws.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by ArchonOSX View Post
              You will need #4 copper AWG or #6 aluminum AWG THHN/THWN for the hot wires and neutral of a 40 amp circuit.
              I realize you transposed AL and CU for this example, but a 40A circuit can be, and is typically, wired with #8CU or #6AL.





              Originally posted by ArchonOSX View Post
              First off, I assume you used NM cable to wire it so changing it is going to be a big problem. If you had conduit you could just pull new wire. Also, make sure the wire in your circuit is #10 copper or #8 aluminum and connected to the 30 amp breaker just so you know the wire is too small and are not assuming this by the size of the breaker.

              Article 210.19 (A) (3) of the 2008 National Electrical Code requires 40 amp minimum for a standard range circuit.
              Quoting from the 2008 NEC is kind of silly since this topic is from January of 2006. Or over 5-1/2 YEARS AGO.

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              • #8
                I agree Speedy. The OP won't EVER see this answer to post submitted by him. That Archon dude is in Battle Creek Michigan.

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                • #9
                  Ha

                  I guess I was time traveling.

                  I just started stopped by this site and this topic was one that was listed toward the top so I errantly assumed it was recent.

                  My bad. And also on the transposing of the wire sizes. Good catch Speedy.

                  Just goes to show you should never drink, read the code book, and type at the same time.

                  LOL
                  Happy 2006
                  ArchonOSX

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                  • #10
                    Time delay...

                    Happy 2006?!! Already???? Yikes!

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