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Monitor 441 rebuild glue/gasket question

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  • Monitor 441 rebuild glue/gasket question

    Hello, I'm new to the group and thankful to have stumbled upon it. They say there is no such thing as a dumb question so here I go. My monitor 441 finally died. Never had I been inside it before, but with the helpful reading here I dove in. I knew the bearings in the combustion motor were bad, so I have changed those. Took the top off the combustion chamber top and checked the ring. seemed ok. Mat fell apart when I touched it and the tray in the pot was off on one side. Took it all apart and ordered a new pot that came with the rope gasket glued on and the mat glued in. Ready to reassemble and now my question...The pot came with a tube of glue and a spreader. Do I use this above where the rope gasket will attach to the chamber? And do any of the other gaskets require glue. Or do they just go on clean and dry?
    Thanks in advance for help.

  • #2
    The tube of glue you got with the pot goes on the rope gasket only. Just a little line all the way round. Be ready when you put the glue on, as it will dry rather quickly. Monitor used burner mat cement on screws and gaskets when they put the stoves together at the factory. This helps seal any screws.

    Back to your burner ring. I will say from past experience you need to get a new burner ring. The ring is one of the most important parts of the burner. If it is the least warped or cracked it needs to be replaced. Save yourself a lot of trouble and replace it. I have never found a stove that needed overhaul that didn't need a new ring.

    Tom

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    • #3
      Thanks Tom,
      You say Monitor used burner mat cement on screws and gaskets at the factory. I have a tube of Rutland 77, should I use that on either side of the ignitor, flame rod and chamber gaskets?

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      • #4
        Not the igniter itself but the igniter cover and all other gaskets on the chamber. Not alot just a skim on either side.

        Tom
        Last edited by hawkins111; 02-02-2019, 11:43 AM.

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        • #5
          Looks like I'm good to go. Thank you for the assist, very much appreciated.

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          • #6
            I never put any glue or sealant on the gaskets of my 422. Makes clean up easier next time they have to be replaced. I use this McMaster-Carr product 9323K21 and make my own gaskets rather than pay $10-$30 each for Monitor brand gaskets. A roll will last a lifetime and the material is much stronger than the material used by Monitor. The material is rated for temperatures up to 1200*F. After it's been exposed to heat for a few years it too becomes brittle and often needs to be replaced when disturbed. If done right you can make about 4-5 different gaskets from a piece of material about 8" square because the gaskets progressively get smaller in diameter and left over pieces from the corners will make gaskets for the flame rod. This material is only 1/8" thick so even though in most cases it's not necessary I go ahead and double the gasket material on the bottom burn chamber gasket just to be sure I have a good airtight fit. Everywhere else a single ply gasket.
            Last edited by FordMan59; 02-02-2019, 02:32 PM.

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            • #7
              I always replace the ring too
              Last edited by ctbale; 02-02-2019, 08:24 PM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by FordMan59 View Post
                I never put any glue or sealant on the gaskets of my 422. Makes clean up easier next time they have to be replaced. I use this McMaster-Carr product 9323K21 and make my own gaskets rather than pay $10-$30 each for Monitor brand gaskets. A roll will last a lifetime and the material is much stronger than the material used by Monitor. The material is rated for temperatures up to 1200*F. After it's been exposed to heat for a few years it too becomes brittle and often needs to be replaced when disturbed. If done right you can make about 4-5 different gaskets from a piece of material about 8" square because the gaskets progressively get smaller in diameter and left over pieces from the corners will make gaskets for the flame rod. This material is only 1/8" thick so even though in most cases it's not necessary I go ahead and double the gasket material on the bottom burn chamber gasket just to be sure I have a good airtight fit. Everywhere else a single ply gasket.
                do you ever double the ignitor gasket? I have noticed that 1/8" is a bit thin, but its been working. The outer metal cover seals it also.

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                • #9
                  So, I'm guessing that glue wouldn't hurt on the gaskets, but it's not necessary. Looks like the ones on mine are original. Either were stuck on with glue from factory as Tom said, or just stuck from time. If glue isn't needed, I'm going to put my new ones on without glue. I opted to get original gaskets with my burner pot. Being my 1st time doing this, I figured it was best. Next time...if I need to again, I'll go the McMaster route. My burner ring looks good to me, but might replace it as you suggest and keep the old one as a backup.
                  Thanks again

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ctbale View Post
                    do you ever double the ignitor gasket? I have noticed that 1/8" is a bit thin, but its been working. The outer metal cover seals it also.
                    Not that I can remember, but as long as it don't interfere with the igniter bracket seating properly it wouldn't hurt anything. The reason I double the one on the bottom of the burn chamber is because the lip on the bottom of the chamber is about 1/8" deep and I was afraid if I didn't double it I wouldn't get an air tight fit. I bought the roll I have when I rebuilt the chamber in my 422 in 2012. I've disassembled some parts a few times since. I also sold someone a 1' section off my roll so they wouldn't have to buy a whole roll and I still have well over half the roll left plus I have several extra gaskets already cut so if I need one at short notice.

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                    • #11
                      I know guys here might cringe when they hear this but I have also used 1/4" wood stove door rope. Works great. You can get 7' for $4 ish. I use red high temp silicon to tack it to the lower flange of the heat exchanger just on the outside of the screw holes. I just use the silicon as an assembly aid. Its the perfect diameter, perfect squish.

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